Darvill's Rare Prints, fine antique prints and rare maps since 1918! Darvill's Rare Prints, fine antique prints and rare maps since 1918!
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Darvill's Rare Prints is pleased to offer a huge selection of original H.K. Browne ("Phiz") prints from various Charles Dickens publications.

The prints below are from Dickens' "Dombey and Son"
which was released in parts between October, 1846 and April, 1848.

Begun whilst in Lausanne, away from home, London and favourite walks, Dombey and Son is about failed communities and aloneness, “dreary” homes and travel, unwelcome reunions and partings, in a world rather like our own, where finance, goods, commerce and people circulate in an increasingly globalised way. If, as is often supposed, later novels like Bleak House are “about” the often-hidden links between people, Dombey and Son is particularly concerned with the disconnections, discontinuities and gaps between people in a world of economic, social and colonial flux. Indeed, the two approaches are not as dissimilar as they may first seem: a book about hidden links may actually be the same thing as a book about the gaps between people—both are comments on a modernity in which traditional, straightforward relations are undermined and even erased.

Dickens's seventh novel, Dealings with the Firm Dombey and Son: Wholesale, Retail, and for Exportation, was published in twenty monthly parts between October 1846 and April 1848 by Bradbury and Evans. Original illustrations were undertaken by Hablot Browne (“Phiz”). It was first published complete in April 1848 and was very well-received.

[Source: Literary Encyclopedia]

 

These are original prints over 160 years old, not reproductions.
Page size is approximately 5 3/8 x 8 1/4 inches.
There may be some damp staining or foxing on the prints due to their age,
so please have a look at the provided enlargements
by clicking on the thumbnails below.

We have many more prints by Phiz...
please see the Satire/Humor page by clicking here.

H.K. Browne, also known as Phiz

 

Background:

Dickens worked in close collaboration with his illustrators, supplying them with an overall summary of the work at the outset for the cover illustration which was printed on heavy colored stock, usually green, which served as a wrapper for each of the monthly parts. Dickens briefed the illustrator on plans for each month's installment so that work on the two illustrations could begin before he wrote them.

This close working relationship with his illustrators is important to readers of Dickens today. The illustrations give us a glimpse of the characters as Dickens described them to the illustrator and approved when the drawing was finished. Film makers still use the illustrations as a basis for characterization, costume, and set design in the dramatization of Dickens' works.

 

When Robert Seymour committed suicide after the second installment of Pickwick the author and his publishers needed a new illustrator. Artists such as John Leech, William Makepeace Thackeray, and Robert W. Buss were considered but the man selected was Hablot Knight Browne who had done some work for Chapman and Hall earlier and had worked with Dickens on a recent pamphlet.

Browne and Dickens developed an excellent working relationship and Browne took the nickname Phiz to complement Dickens' Boz. Browne would go on to illustrate Dickens' work for 23 years, ten of Dicken's novels were illustrated by Phiz. Browne's comic/satiric style of illustration did not fit well with Dickens' later, more serious, novels and after the somewhat disappointing illustrations for A Tale of Two Cities, he never worked for Dickens again.

Phiz and Emblematic Detail
In the background of many of the Phiz illustrations of Dickens' novels the illustrator introduces details that help to interpret what is happening in the story. Some of these emblematic details are rather obvious and some are more subtle. Michael Steig, in his book Dickens and Phiz, argues effectively that, although Dickens gave detailed instructions as to the content of the illustrations, many of the emblematic details in the illustrations were added by Phiz on his own.

An excellent source of information about Dickens illustrators (including the above) can be found here.

 


Frontispiece to

Frontispiece to "Dombey and Son"

$25
(foxed)

 


Miss Fox introduces the Party

Miss Fox introduces the Party

$15

 


The Dombey Family

The Dombey Family

$15

 


The Christening Party

The Christening Party

$10
(some foxing, narrow left margin)

 


Polly rescues the Charitable Grinder

Polly rescues the Charitable Grinder

$20
(some foxing)

 


Captain Cuttle consoles his Friend

Captain Cuttle consoles his Friend

$15

 


Doctor Blimber's Young Gentlemen as they appeared when enjoying themselves

Doctor Blimber's Young Gentlemen as they appeared when enjoying themselves

$20

 


Paul's exercises

Paul's exercises

$15
(some foxing)

 


Paul goes home for the holidays

Paul goes home for the holidays

$20

 


Profound cogitation of Captain Cuttle

Profound cogitation of Captain Cuttle

$20

 


Let him remember

"Let him remember it in that room, years to come!"

$15
(foxing)

 


Poor Paul's Friend

Poor Paul's Friend

$15
(foxing)


The Wooden Midshipman on the look-out

The Wooden Midshipman
on the look-out

(click here for interesting note)

 


Major Bagstock is delighted to have that opportunity

Major Bagstock is delighted to have that opportunity

$15

 


Mr. Toots becomes particular-Diogenes also

Mr. Toots becomes particular—Diogenes also

$20

 


Solemn references made to Mr. Bumsby

Solemn references made
to Mr. Bumsby

$15

 


Mr. Carker introduces himself to Florence & the Skettles family

Mr. Carker introduces himself to Florence & the Skettles family

$20

 


Joe B. is sly, Sir, devilishly sly

Joe B. is sly, Sir, devilishly sly

$20
(some foxing)

 


The eyes of Mrs. Chick are opened to Lucretia Tox

The eyes of Mrs. Chick
are opened to Lucretia Tox

$15
(some foxing)

 


Coming home from church

Coming home from Church

$20
(trimmed title area)

 


A Visitor of distinction

A Visitor of distinction
[Rob the Grinder Reading
with Captain Cuttle]

$20

 


A Visitor of distinction

A Visitor of distinction
[Rob the Grinder Admires the Nobby Shropshire One]

$25

 


The rejected alms

The rejected alms

$15

 


Miss Tox pays a visit to the Toodle Family

Miss Tox pays a visit
to the Toodle Family

$20

 


The Midshipman is boarded by the enemy

The Midshipman is
boarded by the enemy

 


A chance Meeting

A chance Meeting

(corner loss)

 

 


Mr. Dombey and his 'confidential agent'

Mr. Dombey and his
'confidential agent'

 


Florence parts from a very old friend

Florence parts from a very old friend

$15

 


Abstraction & Recognition

Abstraction & Recognition

$15

 


Florence & Edith on the staircase

Florence & Edith on the Staircase

 


The Shadow in the little parlor

The Shadow in the little parlor

 


Mr. Domby and the World

Mr. Domby and the World

 


Secret Intelligence

Secret Intelligence

$15

 


Mr. Carker in his hour of triumph

Mr. Carker in his hour of triumph

 


An arrival

An arrival

$10
(trimmed margin)

 
 

Many more Phiz Dickens prints on the Humor and Satire page