Navigation 2017 with view cart

Seymour's Humorous Sketches Illustrated in Prose and Verse
by Alfred Crowquill

(1866, London, Henry G. Bohn, publisher)

Original engravings
by Henry Wallis, after sketches by Robert Seymour
Sheet size: approx. 5 7/8 x 9 3/4 inches
(scattered foxing on some plates, please see enlargements)

FOR HAND-COLOURED VERSIONS OF THESE PRINTS, PLEASE CLICK HERE

Robert Seymour, a graphic humourist of the highest order, was born in or near London, about the year 1800. He was apprenticed at the usual age to Mr. Thomas Vaughan, an eminent pattern-drawer in Spitalfields, and his practice in that department of art appears to have given him the facility and accuracy of pencil for which he was afterwards so distinguished. Within a very short period of fulfilling his term of apprenticeship, he commenced, on his own account, as a painter in oils, and must have been tolerably expert at that early age, as already in the spring of 1822, we find him exhibiting a picture of some pretensions at the Royal Academy.

Source: Biographical Notice from Seymour's Humorous Sketches by publisher Henry G. Bohn.

The Crack Shots
The "Crack Shots." No. 1
(The Cockney and Bird-catcher.)

I've got a visper for you, Sir, I don't vish to be importite, but next time you shoots a bir vot I've brought to my call, I'll shoot you into a clay pit, that's all.

$20

The Crack Shots
The "Crack Shots." No. 3
(A natural alarm.)

You needn't be afeard Sir, I ant a haming at you.

$15
(same as to left, but no color)

The Pic-nic No. 1
The Pic-nic. No. 1
(A boat load. Warning: "Not allowed to land and dine.)

Oh! oh! very well; then we'll only land here and dine a little further on.

$20

The Pic-nic No. 2
The Pic-nic. No. 2
(Unpacking the supplies.)

Oh dear! here's the sherry and mix'd pickle broke.
Yes, and they've broke into the pastry too.


$20

Dr. Spraggs
Dr. Spraggs
(His new purchase of an old hunter, which runs away with him.)

Throw physic to the dogs. Whoy! whoy! whoy! I don't want to go a hunting, if you do.

$20

The Bumpkin
The Bumpkin
(Domestic Economy, old woman presiding.)

Old Woman: Not make a dinner of Horsebeans? you dainty dog. I wish you may never have worse.
Plough Boy: Noa, mother; I hopes I never shall.


$15

The Pouter and the Dragon
The Pouter and the Dragon
(The Farmer's whack.)

Another pigeon, egad, I'm in luck's way this morning.

$20

Strawberries and Cream
Strawberries and Cream
(A Gourmand regaling.)

[As savoury as a pot of treacle to a blue-bottle.] text not printed, but in index.

$20

The Jolly Anglers
The Jolly Anglers
(Anglers under the influence of Barclay and Perkins.)

Don't you like a day's fishing Sam?
Oh, werry much, werry much.
Ah, but some people don't know how to go a fishing Sam, they are such fools.


$20

The Eating House
The Eating House

Clerical Gent, in a soft voice: "A small portion of veal and ham, well done."
Waiter, in a voice of thunder: "Plate of veal, and dam vell done."


$20

Practice
Practice
(School-boys Rifle shooting.)

Out of the way, Sugar-lips, I am sure I shall hit him this time.

$15

Precept
Precept
(An Old Toper, teaching the young Idea.)

Young men should practice, san intermission, until they can drink four bottles without being flustered, then they will be sober people, for it won't be easy to make them tipsey, a drunken man I abominate!!!

$20

A Day's Pleasure. No. 3
A Day's Pleasure. No. 3 Dobb's Duck
(Mr. Dobbs's wife overboard.)

The deep, deep Sea.

Mr. Dobbs singing—"Hearts as warm as those above lie under the waters cold."

$15

Practical Joker
Practical Joker. No. 1
(Jim Smith, masked as a Demon, perched on a Stile.)

D'ye want a pound of magic shot?

Practical Joker
Practical Joker. No. 2
(Tom's Reprisal—about to shoot.)

Oh, Tom don't shoot, don't shoot, it's only me—Jim Smith.

$20

Fishing for Whiting at Margate
Fishing for Whiting at Margate
(Qualmishness.)

You'll be sure Sir, to feel when there's any thing on your hooks, don't you feel any thing yet?

Why yes! I feels werry unwell.

$20

City Sportsmen Feeding
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 4
(City Sportsmen Feeding.)

I say, Jim, what birds are most like now?

Why, swallows to be sure!

$15

A Stalking Horse
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 5
A Stalking Horse
(Urchins shooting a game-cock in a farm-yard.)

Oh, here's sich a plummy one, don't you hear how he's singing?

$15

The Cricket Match
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 7
The Cricket Match
(Maximo-rotundo Croblle bowled out.)

Out!, so don't fatigue yourself, I beg, Sir.

$20

The Hunter
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 8
The Hunter
(Crobble spilt off his horse.)

Hunting may be a sport, but I'm bless'd if it's pleasure.

$20

A Row to Blackwell
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 9
A Row to Blackwell
(Aunt Betty and Miss Scrags spilt.)

TO BE SOLD, warranted sound, A Grey Mare, very fast, and carries a lady likewise a Bay Cob quiet to ride or drive & has carried a lady.

$20

The Pic-nic
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 9
The Pic-nic
(On the banks of the Lea.)

O Lawkes, there's that nasty cow walking all over our dinner! Oh dear, Oh dear, there goes his foot into the currant and raspberry pie!

$20

Monsieur Dubois
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 12
Monsieur Dubois
(A poor French teacher, with Episode of a fighting dustman and a crossing-sweeper.)

I shan't fight with fistesses, its vulgar, but if he's a mind for anything like a gemmen here's my card.

$15

A Dilemma
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 14
A Dilemma
(A chaise party in a fix, having lost their way.)

A Country Excursion

Ee cawnt gow back 'cause tha locks tha gates. Well can we go forward then?
Noa ee cawnt cawse the roads under water.


$15

An Old Acquaintance
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 15
An Old Acquaintance
(A School-boy breaking the barometer.)

Only three holidays left, and still this plaguey glass says very wet. I can't bear it, and I won't

$15

I think there must be something wrong with your rowing
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 17
Promotion
(Steering one way and rowing another.)

I think there must be something wrong with your rowing.
My rowing! nonsense! it's your steering.

$25

PREVIOUS PAGE | NEXT PAGE OF Seymour's Humorous Sketches

FOR HAND-COLOURED VERSIONS OF THESE PRINTS, PLEASE CLICK HERE

Click here to return to the Humour and Satire homepage