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Opera Selectiora Quæ Titianus Vercellius Cadubriensis, Et Paulus Calliari Veronensis Inventarunt Ac Pinxerunt, Quæ Que Valentinus Le Febre Bruxellensis Delineavit, Et Sculpsit: Christianissimo Ludovico magno Franciæ, Et Navarræ Regi Invictissimo. Sacrat, Vovet Iacobus Van Campen

Titian

(Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)

Paolo Veronese

(born Paolo Caliari, 1528–1588)

Tintoretto

(born Jacobo Robusti, 1518–1594)


A very important and rare work of famous Titian, Veronese, and Tintoretto paintings – in etched form. The etchings were executed by Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (Valentin Lefèvre) and published by Giacomo Van Campen (Jacob Van Campen) in Venice in 1682.
Interestingly, there are 3 versions of each etching: the final version with lettering and attribution; a reversed proof (counterproof) before lettering and attributions; and another counterproof (also reversed, but with the lettering and attributions in reverse) pressed on India paper then laid down on the handmade chain-laid paper. Since the counterproofs are made from a fresh "regular" proof, they tend to be quite a bit lighter. See link above for definition of counterproofs.

Original etchings, 340 years old

Sheet size: varies slightly, but approximately 15 3/4 x 22 1/4 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

Please click on a thumbnail image for an enlarged view of the entire plate. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

Titian etching from 1682 St Anthony heaing foot of Wrathful Son
REF #1

THE HEALING OF THE WRATHFUL SON
(AKA, The Miracle of the Healed Foot)

St. Anthony reattaching the foot of a young man who had cut it off in an outburst of violent temper because he had hurt his mother with it.

The Scuola del Santo in Padua, the house where the brotherhood of St. Anthony met, was on the edge of the square in front of the church in which the famous Franciscan saint was buried. In 1510-11 Titian worked alongside other painters to decorate two walls in the upper assembly room (Sala Capitolare) with frescoes depicting miracles from the saint's life. He painted three scenes from the Life of St Anthony of Padua. They are the first of Titian's works that can be definitely dated and that still exist in their entirety.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkle mid image (not very noticeable). Small paper loss (worm or moth hole?) to extreme lower right edge of paper. Two holes at top edge (large staples?)

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$275

Titian etching from 1682 St Anthony heaing foot of Wrathful Son
REF #1B

THE HEALING OF THE WRATHFUL SON
(AKA, The Miracle of the Healed Foot)

St. Anthony reattaching the foot of a young man who had cut it off in an outburst of violent temper because he had hurt his mother with it.

The Scuola del Santo in Padua, the house where the brotherhood of St. Anthony met, was on the edge of the square in front of the church in which the famous Franciscan saint was buried. In 1510-11 Titian worked alongside other painters to decorate two walls in the upper assembly room (Sala Capitolare) with frescoes depicting miracles from the saint's life. He painted three scenes from the Life of St Anthony of Padua. They are the first of Titian's works that can be definitely dated and that still exist in their entirety.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITHOUT LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkle mid image (not very noticeable). Small paper loss (worm or moth hole?) to extreme lower right edge of paper. Two holes at top and bottom margins (large staples?). Mild foxing in margins. Short edge tear right side.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$175

Titian etching from 1682 St Anthony heaing foot of Wrathful Son
REF #1C

THE HEALING OF THE WRATHFUL SON
(AKA, The Miracle of the Healed Foot)

St. Anthony reattaching the foot of a young man who had cut it off in an outburst of violent temper because he had hurt his mother with it.

The Scuola del Santo in Padua, the house where the brotherhood of St. Anthony met, was on the edge of the square in front of the church in which the famous Franciscan saint was buried. In 1510-11 Titian worked alongside other painters to decorate two walls in the upper assembly room (Sala Capitolare) with frescoes depicting miracles from the saint's life. He painted three scenes from the Life of St Anthony of Padua. They are the first of Titian's works that can be definitely dated and that still exist in their entirety.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkle mid image (not very noticeable). Small stain top middle above the image area.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$75

Titian etching from 1682 THE PENITENT SAINT JEROME
REF #2

THE PENITENT SAINT JEROME

The Penitent Saint Jerome is dated to the final period of Titian’s career. During these years Titian continued to paint masterpieces, such as the great canvas of The Martyrdom of Saint Lawrence for the monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial; Tarquin and Lucretia, in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge; and The Flaying of Marsyas in the Kromeriz Palace, all dated to the last decade of his life. Also from this period are two famous works for Philip II commemorating the victory of the battle of Lepanto over the Turks in 1571. These are Philip II offering the Infante don Fernando to the Heavens, which also commemorates the birth of the Infante, and Religion succoured by Spain (both Museo del Prado, Madrid). Among the information on the end of the artist’s life included in his chapter on Titian, Vasari commented: “The last time I saw him was in his studio in Venice, in 1566, and I found him standing in front of a canvas, with his brushes in his hand”. Regarding the artist’s health, Vasari states: “He had a robust constitution, was almost never ill and never had a serious health problem; up to his death at nearly 100 he retained all his faculties, sight and pulse”.

Titian depicted Saint Jerome on various occasions, one of the earliest examples of which is now in the Musée du Louvre, Paris. In that horizontal composition of around 1530 the kneeling saint occupies the centre of the canvas in a clearing in a leafy landscape. Titian conceives the present version as a nocturnal scene in which the moon is hidden behind some thick tree trunks but still illuminates the sky with a great glow. The landscape that envelops the saint has been considered one of the artist’s finest and most poetic. Another version now in the Brera in Milan of around the mid-1550s was originally painted for Santa Maria Nuova in Venice and is considered the prototype for the present painting. It now has an arched top that was added in the 18th century. In the Brera version Titian included symbols that refer to meditation and the ascetic life such as the skull, hourglass, books and ivy twining over the rocks that form the saint’s altar.

In the present version, executed twenty years after the Brera composition, Titian omitted these elements and here focuses on the figure, which takes on a more important physical presence in the centre of the canvas. Jerome is enveloped in a wild landscape to which the colour range and brushstroke give a sense of unity. The artist emphasised the idea of penitence through the saint’s hands and gaze. Thus he holds a stone in his right hand for beating his breast, while his left hand rests on the book on which he meditates as he looks towards the crucifix supported on a long branch. At Jerome’s feet is a rustic flail made of branches leaning against the rock by his left knee, while the lion occupies the lower right corner, its head lost in the background. The colour range is narrow, almost monochrome, with highly subtle modulations of earth tones. Titian used these modulations to create a freely-painted area of landscape through which the bare canvas can be seen. The only strong patch of colour is in Jerome’s red tunic and in a small area of red in the sky. The use of red, which is particularly rapidly painted on the saint’s left leg, functions as another way of emphasising the principal motif of the composition.

Of similar date to the present work is the canvas of Saint Jerome in San Lorenzo de El Escorial. In that work, however, Titian expanded his range of colours and painted a landscape with intense shades of blue in the centre. He also used the symbols of the saint found in the Brera version and modified the lion in the corner.

A drawing was discovered on the reverse of the original canvas of this work, depicting the saint in the reverse direction to the final composition. This drawing was found when the canvas was relined in 1965.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles, stain at top margin and bottom edge of etching.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$325

Titian etching from 1682 THE PENITENT SAINT JEROME
REF #2B

THE PENITENT SAINT JEROME

The Penitent Saint Jerome is dated to the final period of Titian’s career. During these years Titian continued to paint masterpieces, such as the great canvas of The Martyrdom of Saint Lawrence for the monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial; Tarquin and Lucretia, in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge; and The Flaying of Marsyas in the Kromeriz Palace, all dated to the last decade of his life. Also from this period are two famous works for Philip II commemorating the victory of the battle of Lepanto over the Turks in 1571. These are Philip II offering the Infante don Fernando to the Heavens, which also commemorates the birth of the Infante, and Religion succoured by Spain (both Museo del Prado, Madrid). Among the information on the end of the artist’s life included in his chapter on Titian, Vasari commented: “The last time I saw him was in his studio in Venice, in 1566, and I found him standing in front of a canvas, with his brushes in his hand”. Regarding the artist’s health, Vasari states: “He had a robust constitution, was almost never ill and never had a serious health problem; up to his death at nearly 100 he retained all his faculties, sight and pulse”.

Titian depicted Saint Jerome on various occasions, one of the earliest examples of which is now in the Musée du Louvre, Paris. In that horizontal composition of around 1530 the kneeling saint occupies the centre of the canvas in a clearing in a leafy landscape. Titian conceives the present version as a nocturnal scene in which the moon is hidden behind some thick tree trunks but still illuminates the sky with a great glow. The landscape that envelops the saint has been considered one of the artist’s finest and most poetic. Another version now in the Brera in Milan of around the mid-1550s was originally painted for Santa Maria Nuova in Venice and is considered the prototype for the present painting. It now has an arched top that was added in the 18th century. In the Brera version Titian included symbols that refer to meditation and the ascetic life such as the skull, hourglass, books and ivy twining over the rocks that form the saint’s altar.

In the present version, executed twenty years after the Brera composition, Titian omitted these elements and here focuses on the figure, which takes on a more important physical presence in the centre of the canvas. Jerome is enveloped in a wild landscape to which the colour range and brushstroke give a sense of unity. The artist emphasised the idea of penitence through the saint’s hands and gaze. Thus he holds a stone in his right hand for beating his breast, while his left hand rests on the book on which he meditates as he looks towards the crucifix supported on a long branch. At Jerome’s feet is a rustic flail made of branches leaning against the rock by his left knee, while the lion occupies the lower right corner, its head lost in the background. The colour range is narrow, almost monochrome, with highly subtle modulations of earth tones. Titian used these modulations to create a freely-painted area of landscape through which the bare canvas can be seen. The only strong patch of colour is in Jerome’s red tunic and in a small area of red in the sky. The use of red, which is particularly rapidly painted on the saint’s left leg, functions as another way of emphasising the principal motif of the composition.

Of similar date to the present work is the canvas of Saint Jerome in San Lorenzo de El Escorial. In that work, however, Titian expanded his range of colours and painted a landscape with intense shades of blue in the centre. He also used the symbols of the saint found in the Brera version and modified the lion in the corner.

A drawing was discovered on the reverse of the original canvas of this work, depicting the saint in the reverse direction to the final composition. This drawing was found when the canvas was relined in 1965.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITHOUT LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles, small damp stain extreme lower left bottom edge. Holes at top and bottom of paper where the paper was held in place during the pressing of the etching on the paper.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$225

Titian etching from 1682 THE PENITENT SAINT JEROME
REF #2C

THE PENITENT SAINT JEROME

The Penitent Saint Jerome is dated to the final period of Titian’s career. During these years Titian continued to paint masterpieces, such as the great canvas of The Martyrdom of Saint Lawrence for the monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial; Tarquin and Lucretia, in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge; and The Flaying of Marsyas in the Kromeriz Palace, all dated to the last decade of his life. Also from this period are two famous works for Philip II commemorating the victory of the battle of Lepanto over the Turks in 1571. These are Philip II offering the Infante don Fernando to the Heavens, which also commemorates the birth of the Infante, and Religion succoured by Spain (both Museo del Prado, Madrid). Among the information on the end of the artist’s life included in his chapter on Titian, Vasari commented: “The last time I saw him was in his studio in Venice, in 1566, and I found him standing in front of a canvas, with his brushes in his hand”. Regarding the artist’s health, Vasari states: “He had a robust constitution, was almost never ill and never had a serious health problem; up to his death at nearly 100 he retained all his faculties, sight and pulse”.

Titian depicted Saint Jerome on various occasions, one of the earliest examples of which is now in the Musée du Louvre, Paris. In that horizontal composition of around 1530 the kneeling saint occupies the centre of the canvas in a clearing in a leafy landscape. Titian conceives the present version as a nocturnal scene in which the moon is hidden behind some thick tree trunks but still illuminates the sky with a great glow. The landscape that envelops the saint has been considered one of the artist’s finest and most poetic. Another version now in the Brera in Milan of around the mid-1550s was originally painted for Santa Maria Nuova in Venice and is considered the prototype for the present painting. It now has an arched top that was added in the 18th century. In the Brera version Titian included symbols that refer to meditation and the ascetic life such as the skull, hourglass, books and ivy twining over the rocks that form the saint’s altar.

In the present version, executed twenty years after the Brera composition, Titian omitted these elements and here focuses on the figure, which takes on a more important physical presence in the centre of the canvas. Jerome is enveloped in a wild landscape to which the colour range and brushstroke give a sense of unity. The artist emphasised the idea of penitence through the saint’s hands and gaze. Thus he holds a stone in his right hand for beating his breast, while his left hand rests on the book on which he meditates as he looks towards the crucifix supported on a long branch. At Jerome’s feet is a rustic flail made of branches leaning against the rock by his left knee, while the lion occupies the lower right corner, its head lost in the background. The colour range is narrow, almost monochrome, with highly subtle modulations of earth tones. Titian used these modulations to create a freely-painted area of landscape through which the bare canvas can be seen. The only strong patch of colour is in Jerome’s red tunic and in a small area of red in the sky. The use of red, which is particularly rapidly painted on the saint’s left leg, functions as another way of emphasising the principal motif of the composition.

Of similar date to the present work is the canvas of Saint Jerome in San Lorenzo de El Escorial. In that work, however, Titian expanded his range of colours and painted a landscape with intense shades of blue in the centre. He also used the symbols of the saint found in the Brera version and modified the lion in the corner.

A drawing was discovered on the reverse of the original canvas of this work, depicting the saint in the reverse direction to the final composition. This drawing was found when the canvas was relined in 1965.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper. Overall discoloration and original tears and repairs within image. Paper loss upper right corner of etching. Frankly, this print is a bit of a puzzler. There appears to be an original signature (illegible) lower right if etching. The impression is not as faint as most counterproofs. We are not sure about this print as to why it is so different from the other counterproofs in Opera Selectiora, but it appears to be a rare anomaly due to the writing at the bottom and the overall appearance seems to idicate it was more of an artist's proof (Lefevre's) than a traditional counterproof. Also, on the back of the paper there is a notation that it is a "very rare original" – whatever that means! Sorry we don't have more information about this particular rendition of one of Titian's most famous images.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$175

Titian etching from 1682 THE DEATH OF ST. PETER MARTYR
REF #3

THE DEATH OF ST. PETER MARTYR

At the close of the 1520s, Titian completed what used to be considered one of his finest works, The Death of St Peter Martyr. Tragically, it was destroyed in 1867 by fire in the Chapel of Rosary, where the painting was deposited at the time of the fire. The painting presently displayed in the Basilica is an 18th-century copy by Niccolò Cassala.

A vivid ekphrasis by Aretino describes how "you would comprehend all the living terrors of death" in the face and flesh of the man on the ground, and perceive "the pallor of vileness and the whiteness of fear" while contemplating his companion in flight. Aretino's description also brings home how realistic and shocking the image must have seemed to contemporaries. Such violence had never been seen in an altarpiece before, nor had any saint been portrayed in such a humiliating position, but Titian's solution is polemically Venetian in the importance of the landscape, whose trees soar and stir in sympathy with the drama below.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkle mid image (not very noticeable). Small paper loss (worm or moth hole?) to extreme lower right edge of paper. A couple of unobtusive areas of foxing. Ink smudge lower part of title area.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$350

Titian etching from 1682 THE DEATH OF ST. PETER MARTYR
REF #3B

THE DEATH OF ST. PETER MARTYR

At the close of the 1520s, Titian completed what used to be considered one of his finest works, The Death of St Peter Martyr. Tragically, it was destroyed in 1867 by fire in the Chapel of Rosary, where the painting was deposited at the time of the fire. The painting presently displayed in the Basilica is an 18th-century copy by Niccolò Cassala.

A vivid ekphrasis by Aretino describes how "you would comprehend all the living terrors of death" in the face and flesh of the man on the ground, and perceive "the pallor of vileness and the whiteness of fear" while contemplating his companion in flight. Aretino's description also brings home how realistic and shocking the image must have seemed to contemporaries. Such violence had never been seen in an altarpiece before, nor had any saint been portrayed in such a humiliating position, but Titian's solution is polemically Venetian in the importance of the landscape, whose trees soar and stir in sympathy with the drama below.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITHOUT LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkle mid image (not very noticeable). Two holes at top and bottom margins (large staples?). Mild foxing and staining mainly in margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$175

Titian etching from 1682 THE DEATH OF ST. PETER MARTYR
REF #3C

THE DEATH OF ST. PETER MARTYR

At the close of the 1520s, Titian completed what used to be considered one of his finest works, The Death of St Peter Martyr. Tragically, it was destroyed in 1867 by fire in the Chapel of Rosary, where the painting was deposited at the time of the fire. The painting presently displayed in the Basilica is an 18th-century copy by Niccolò Cassala.

A vivid ekphrasis by Aretino describes how "you would comprehend all the living terrors of death" in the face and flesh of the man on the ground, and perceive "the pallor of vileness and the whiteness of fear" while contemplating his companion in flight. Aretino's description also brings home how realistic and shocking the image must have seemed to contemporaries. Such violence had never been seen in an altarpiece before, nor had any saint been portrayed in such a humiliating position, but Titian's solution is polemically Venetian in the importance of the landscape, whose trees soar and stir in sympathy with the drama below.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkles on backing paper. Light staining/foxing around edges of India paper and in margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$75

Titian etching from 1682 THE CONCEPTION OF THE MADONNA
(AKA, The Pesaro Madonna)
REF #4

THE CONCEPTION OF THE MADONNA
(AKA, The Pesaro Madonna)

The Pesaro Madonna (Italian: Pala Pesaro) (better known as the Madonna di Ca' Pesaro) is a painting by the late Italian Renaissance master Titian, commissioned by Jacopo Pesaro, whose family acquired in 1518 the chapel in the Frari Basilica in Venice for which the work was painted, and where it remains today. Jacopo was Bishop of Paphos, in Cyprus, and had been named commander of the papal fleet by the Borgia pope, Alexander VI.[1] This painting recalls one of Titian's earliest paintings Jacopo Pesaro being presented by Pope Alexander VI to Saint Peter.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkle mid image (not very noticeable). Small paper loss (worm or moth hole?) to extreme lower right edge of paper.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$350

Titian etching from 1682 THE CONCEPTION OF THE MADONNA
(AKA, The Pesaro Madonna)
REF #4B

THE CONCEPTION OF THE MADONNA
(AKA, The Pesaro Madonna)

The Pesaro Madonna (Italian: Pala Pesaro) (better known as the Madonna di Ca' Pesaro) is a painting by the late Italian Renaissance master Titian, commissioned by Jacopo Pesaro, whose family acquired in 1518 the chapel in the Frari Basilica in Venice for which the work was painted, and where it remains today. Jacopo was Bishop of Paphos, in Cyprus, and had been named commander of the papal fleet by the Borgia pope, Alexander VI.[1] This painting recalls one of Titian's earliest paintings Jacopo Pesaro being presented by Pope Alexander VI to Saint Peter.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles mid image and margins (not very noticeable). Two holes at top and bottom margins (large staples?). Mild foxing and staining mainly in extreme outer margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$175

Titian etching from 1682 THE CONCEPTION OF THE MADONNA
(AKA, The Pesaro Madonna)
REF #4C

THE CONCEPTION OF THE MADONNA
(AKA, The Pesaro Madonna)

The Pesaro Madonna (Italian: Pala Pesaro) (better known as the Madonna di Ca' Pesaro) is a painting by the late Italian Renaissance master Titian, commissioned by Jacopo Pesaro, whose family acquired in 1518 the chapel in the Frari Basilica in Venice for which the work was painted, and where it remains today. Jacopo was Bishop of Paphos, in Cyprus, and had been named commander of the papal fleet by the Borgia pope, Alexander VI.[1] This painting recalls one of Titian's earliest paintings Jacopo Pesaro being presented by Pope Alexander VI to Saint Peter.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper. Light staining/foxing around edges of India paper and in margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$75

Titian etching from 1682 MADONNA WITH CHILD AND SAINTS
REF #5B

MADONNA WITH CHILD AND SAINTS
(AKA The Madonna in the Clouds)

The large altarpiece of Madonna with Child and Saints was painted between 1533 and 1535 for the church of S. Niccolò della Lattuga in Campo dei Frari at the Lido of Venice, better known as St Niccolò dei Frari. It was purchased by pope Clement XIV for the pontifical palace of the Quirinale (1770 circa) in Rome, where it appears to have never been exhibited. It was however in S. Pietro in Montorio and in 1797 it was brought to Paris. Since 1820 it has been in the Vatican Pinacoteca of Pius VII. The painting, originally arched (that is to say, curved in the upper part, where the dove of the Holy Spirit was portrayed) shows the Virgin with the Child Jesus and angels on the clouds and below Sts Catherine, Nicholas, Peter, Anthony, Francis and Sebastian in prayer. This masterpiece is a work of the full maturity of the artist who, having overcome the early teachings of Bellini and Giorgione, now appears as an independent and fully established personality, so much so as to be considered the main painter of Venice.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITHOUT LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

 

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles mid image and margins (not very noticeable). Two holes at top and bottom margins (large staples?). Mild foxing and staining mainly in extreme outer margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$175

Titian etching from 1682 MADONNA WITH CHILD AND SAINTS
REF #5C

MADONNA WITH CHILD AND SAINTS
(AKA The Madonna in the Clouds)

The large altarpiece of Madonna with Child and Saints was painted between 1533 and 1535 for the church of S. Niccolò della Lattuga in Campo dei Frari at the Lido of Venice, better known as St Niccolò dei Frari. It was purchased by pope Clement XIV for the pontifical palace of the Quirinale (1770 circa) in Rome, where it appears to have never been exhibited. It was however in S. Pietro in Montorio and in 1797 it was brought to Paris. Since 1820 it has been in the Vatican Pinacoteca of Pius VII. The painting, originally arched (that is to say, curved in the upper part, where the dove of the Holy Spirit was portrayed) shows the Virgin with the Child Jesus and angels on the clouds and below Sts Catherine, Nicholas, Peter, Anthony, Francis and Sebastian in prayer. This masterpiece is a work of the full maturity of the artist who, having overcome the early teachings of Bellini and Giorgione, now appears as an independent and fully established personality, so much so as to be considered the main painter of Venice.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITHOUT LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper. Some staining/foxing at top of image.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$75

Titian etching from 1682 THE CROWING OF THORNS
(CHRIST CROWNED WITH THORNS)
REF #6B

THE CROWING OF THORNS
(CHRIST CROWNED WITH THORNS)

The painting was commissioned by the confraternity of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan. It was brought to France after the Napoleonic conquest of the city in 1797.

In The Crowning with Thorns, painted for the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan, the space is compressed in the scene by arranging the figures on a shallow plane delimited by the wall of a building. There are explicit references to antiquity: the figure of Christ derives from the celebrated Laocoon, an antique statue discovered in Rome in 1506, an archetypal exemplum doloris ("example of pain"). Another famous antique sculptural fragment, the Belvedere Torso, provides the model for the upper body of the torturer on the left. With the inclusion of the bust of Tiberius Caesar, a direct reference to the Roman authorities who condemned Christ, Titian also pays homage to the classical past.

This is a brutal scene, in which Christ's tormentors twist the crown onto his head with their canes, but the violence is relieved and Christ's suffering exalted by the beauty of the colours, which especially in the blue and green to the right are colder than usual in deference to Titian's Roman sources. In Christ's foot extended on the steps, however, Titian pulls out all the Venetian stops and one can sense the blood flowing through the veins under the flesh. The pattern of the canes slices through the massed figures like the strokes of a knife, forming a Trinitarian triangle to the right of Christ's head. An inimitable Titian touch is the cane lying unused on the foremost step, still, shadowless and deadly, like a snake.

According to Robert Haven Schauffler, the German painter Fritz von Uhde once considered it to be "the greatest picture ever painted."

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

PROOF WITHOUT LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles mid image and margins (not very noticeable). Two holes at top and bottom margins (large staples or possibly how the paper was secured to make the proof). Mild foxing in margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$275

Titian etching from 1682 THE CROWING OF THORNS
(CHRIST CROWNED WITH THORNS)
REF #6C

THE CROWING OF THORNS
(CHRIST CROWNED WITH THORNS)

The painting was commissioned by the confraternity of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan. It was brought to France after the Napoleonic conquest of the city in 1797.

In The Crowning with Thorns, painted for the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan, the space is compressed in the scene by arranging the figures on a shallow plane delimited by the wall of a building. There are explicit references to antiquity: the figure of Christ derives from the celebrated Laocoon, an antique statue discovered in Rome in 1506, an archetypal exemplum doloris ("example of pain"). Another famous antique sculptural fragment, the Belvedere Torso, provides the model for the upper body of the torturer on the left. With the inclusion of the bust of Tiberius Caesar, a direct reference to the Roman authorities who condemned Christ, Titian also pays homage to the classical past.

This is a brutal scene, in which Christ's tormentors twist the crown onto his head with their canes, but the violence is relieved and Christ's suffering exalted by the beauty of the colours, which especially in the blue and green to the right are colder than usual in deference to Titian's Roman sources. In Christ's foot extended on the steps, however, Titian pulls out all the Venetian stops and one can sense the blood flowing through the veins under the flesh. The pattern of the canes slices through the massed figures like the strokes of a knife, forming a Trinitarian triangle to the right of Christ's head. An inimitable Titian touch is the cane lying unused on the foremost step, still, shadowless and deadly, like a snake.

According to Robert Haven Schauffler, the German painter Fritz von Uhde once considered it to be "the greatest picture ever painted."

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

PROOF WITHOUT LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper. Some mild staining/foxing. Curiously, in the lower right corner of the image, there is a half-circle of laid paper covering that area of the proof.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$150

Titian etching from 1682 THE ARCHANGEL RAPHAEL AND TOBIT
REF #8

THE ARCHANGEL RAPHAEL AND TOBIT

(AKA, Saint Raphael with Tobias)

The Pesaro Madonna (Italian: Pala Pesaro) (better known as the Madonna di Ca' Pesaro) is a painting by the late Italian Renaissance master Titian, commissioned by Jacopo Pesaro, whose family acquired in 1518 the chapel in the Frari Basilica in Venice for which the work was painted, and where it remains today. Jacopo was Bishop of Paphos, in Cyprus, and had been named commander of the papal fleet by the Borgia pope, Alexander VI.[1] This painting recalls one of Titian's earliest paintings Jacopo Pesaro being presented by Pope Alexander VI to Saint Peter.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkles mid image (not very noticeable). Small stains outside of image area where the etching was adhered to the backing paper.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$325

Titian etching from 1682 THE ARCHANGEL RAPHAEL AND TOBIT

(AKA, Saint Raphael with Tobias)
REF #8B

THE ARCHANGEL RAPHAEL AND TOBIT

(AKA, Saint Raphael with Tobias)

The Pesaro Madonna (Italian: Pala Pesaro) (better known as the Madonna di Ca' Pesaro) is a painting by the late Italian Renaissance master Titian, commissioned by Jacopo Pesaro, whose family acquired in 1518 the chapel in the Frari Basilica in Venice for which the work was painted, and where it remains today. Jacopo was Bishop of Paphos, in Cyprus, and had been named commander of the papal fleet by the Borgia pope, Alexander VI.[1] This painting recalls one of Titian's earliest paintings Jacopo Pesaro being presented by Pope Alexander VI to Saint Peter.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles mid image and margins (not very noticeable). Two holes at top and bottom margins (large staples?). Mild foxing in extreme outer margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$225

Titian etching from 1682 THE ARCHANGEL RAPHAEL AND TOBIT

(AKA, Saint Raphael with Tobias)
REF #8C

THE ARCHANGEL RAPHAEL AND TOBIT

(AKA, Saint Raphael with Tobias)

The Pesaro Madonna (Italian: Pala Pesaro) (better known as the Madonna di Ca' Pesaro) is a painting by the late Italian Renaissance master Titian, commissioned by Jacopo Pesaro, whose family acquired in 1518 the chapel in the Frari Basilica in Venice for which the work was painted, and where it remains today. Jacopo was Bishop of Paphos, in Cyprus, and had been named commander of the papal fleet by the Borgia pope, Alexander VI.[1] This painting recalls one of Titian's earliest paintings Jacopo Pesaro being presented by Pope Alexander VI to Saint Peter.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper. Light staining/foxing around edges of India paper and in margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$175

Titian etching from 1682 CAIN KILLING ABEL
REF #9

CAIN KILLING ABEL

Abel is slain by his brother Cain.

Abel's leg, his left arm and Cain's curved body form part of a circle that makes the picture very dynamic. The effects of the dark sky and the threatening Cain are emphasized by the perspective, which suggests a low point of view.

The painting is now in the church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice. It was originally made as a ceiling painting for the Santo Spirito in Isola. Titian made two other ceiling paintings for that church, one on David and Goliath and one on the Sacrifice of Isaac – see below for the etchings of these that are available here at Darvill's Rare Prints.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkles mid image (not very noticeable)

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$325

Titian etching from 1682 CAIN KILLING ABEL
REF #9B

CAIN KILLING ABEL

Abel is slain by his brother Cain.

Abel's leg, his left arm and Cain's curved body form part of a circle that makes the picture very dynamic. The effects of the dark sky and the threatening Cain are emphasized by the perspective, which suggests a low point of view.

The painting is now in the church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice. It was originally made as a ceiling painting for the Santo Spirito in Isola. Titian made two other ceiling paintings for that church, one on David and Goliath and one on the Sacrifice of Isaac – see below for the etchings of these that are available here at Darvill's Rare Prints.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles mid image and margins (not very noticeable). Two holes at top and bottom margins (large staples?). Mild foxing/staining in extreme outer margins and a couple of unobtrusive fox marks within the image itself – very small and not at all noticeable really. Short stabilized tear at right edge of paper.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$225

Titian etching from 1682 CAIN KILLING ABEL
REF #9C

CAIN KILLING ABEL

Abel is slain by his brother Cain.

Abel's leg, his left arm and Cain's curved body form part of a circle that makes the picture very dynamic. The effects of the dark sky and the threatening Cain are emphasized by the perspective, which suggests a low point of view.

The painting is now in the church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice. It was originally made as a ceiling painting for the Santo Spirito in Isola. Titian made two other ceiling paintings for that church, one on David and Goliath and one on the Sacrifice of Isaac – see below for the etchings of these that are available here at Darvill's Rare Prints.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.) In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper. Light staining/foxing around edges of India paper and in margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$175

Titian etching from 1682 THE SACRIFICE OF ISAAC
REF #10

THE SACRIFICE OF ISAAC

Abraham, holding a sword, is in the centre standing on a rock. Next to him, Isaac is kneeling on a pyre. At top-left, an angel is holding the sword. Head of a donkey at lower-left and head of a sheep at lower-right.

Print made by Valentin Lefebre (Lefevre). After Titian's ceiling-painting, originally at Santo Spirito in Isola, later moved to Sta Maria della Salute in Venice.

Printed/published posthumously by Jacobus van Campen in 1682 in Venice.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkles mid image (not very noticeable). A couple of small fox marks within image area and a smudge in the outer right margin.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$275

Titian etching from 1682 THE SACRIFICE OF ISAAC
REF #10B

THE SACRIFICE OF ISAAC

Abraham, holding a sword, is in the centre standing on a rock. Next to him, Isaac is kneeling on a pyre. At top-right, an angel is holding the sword. Head of a donkey at lower-right and head of a sheep at lower-left.

Print made by Valentin Lefebre (Lefevre). After Titian's ceiling-painting, originally at Santo Spirito in Isola, later moved to Sta Maria della Salute in Venice.

Printed/published posthumously by Jacobus van Campen in 1682 in Venice.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles mid image and margins (not very noticeable). Two holes at top and bottom margins (large staples?). Mild foxing/staining mainly in margins. A somewhat faint impression.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$125

Titian etching from 1682 THE SACRIFICE OF ISAAC
REF #10C

THE SACRIFICE OF ISAAC

Abraham, holding a sword, is in the centre standing on a rock. Next to him, Isaac is kneeling on a pyre. At top-right, an angel is holding the sword. Head of a donkey at lower-right and head of a sheep at lower-left.

Print made by Valentin Lefebre (Lefevre). After Titian's ceiling-painting, originally at Santo Spirito in Isola, later moved to Sta Maria della Salute in Venice.

Printed/published posthumously by Jacobus van Campen in 1682 in Venice.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.) In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper. Light staining/foxing around edges of India paper and in margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$100

Titian etching from 1682 DAVID WITH THE KILLED GIANT
REF #11

DAVID WITH THE KILLED GIANT
(AKA DAVID AND GOLIATH)

Simply a magnificent painting by the Venetian painter, draughtsman and designer Titian (born Tiziano Vecellio 1489-1576). Perhaps the greatest Venetian painter of the Renaissance, Titian was called by his contemporaries The Sun Amidst Small Stars (after the final line of Dante’s Paradiso). He was a remarkably versatile painter, equally at home with landscapes, portraits and large narrative pictures. He is particularly important to art history because of his unique mastery of color.

Titian was born in Pieve di Cardore, in Venice, and lived to be quite an old man by Renaissance standards. His style changed often throughout his lifetime, but his serious study and application of color was a constant throughout his career. His later works were, perhaps, muted compared to his earlier pictures, but his overall approach also grew in subtlety.

This painting is now in the church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice. It was originally made as a ceiling painting for the Santo Spirito in Isola; Titian made two other ceiling paintings for that church, Cain and Abel and the Sacrifice of Isaac (the etchings of these famous paintings are also available here at Darvill's, see above).

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkles mid image (not very noticeable). Paper loss lower left corner.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$275

Titian etching from 1682 DAVID and goliath
REF #11B

DAVID WITH THE KILLED GIANT
(AKA DAVID AND GOLIATH)

Simply a magnificent painting by the Venetian painter, draughtsman and designer Titian (born Tiziano Vecellio 1489-1576). Perhaps the greatest Venetian painter of the Renaissance, Titian was called by his contemporaries The Sun Amidst Small Stars (after the final line of Dante’s Paradiso). He was a remarkably versatile painter, equally at home with landscapes, portraits and large narrative pictures. He is particularly important to art history because of his unique mastery of color.

Titian was born in Pieve di Cardore, in Venice, and lived to be quite an old man by Renaissance standards. His style changed often throughout his lifetime, but his serious study and application of color was a constant throughout his career. His later works were, perhaps, muted compared to his earlier pictures, but his overall approach also grew in subtlety.

This painting is now in the church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice. It was originally made as a ceiling painting for the Santo Spirito in Isola; Titian made two other ceiling paintings for that church, Cain and Abel and the Sacrifice of Isaac (the etchings of these famous paintings are also available here at Darvill's, see above).

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles mid image and margins (not very noticeable). Two holes at top and bottom margins (large staples?). Some foxing/staining in margins. Damp stain lower right edge of paper, well away from the image area.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$125

Titian etching from 1682 DAVID WITH THE KILLED GIANT
REF #11C

DAVID WITH THE KILLED GIANT
(AKA DAVID AND GOLIATH)

Simply a magnificent painting by the Venetian painter, draughtsman and designer Titian (born Tiziano Vecellio 1489-1576). Perhaps the greatest Venetian painter of the Renaissance, Titian was called by his contemporaries The Sun Amidst Small Stars (after the final line of Dante’s Paradiso). He was a remarkably versatile painter, equally at home with landscapes, portraits and large narrative pictures. He is particularly important to art history because of his unique mastery of color.

Titian was born in Pieve di Cardore, in Venice, and lived to be quite an old man by Renaissance standards. His style changed often throughout his lifetime, but his serious study and application of color was a constant throughout his career. His later works were, perhaps, muted compared to his earlier pictures, but his overall approach also grew in subtlety.

This painting is now in the church of Santa Maria della Salute in Venice. It was originally made as a ceiling painting for the Santo Spirito in Isola; Titian made two other ceiling paintings for that church, Cain and Abel and the Sacrifice of Isaac (the etchings of these famous paintings are also available here at Darvill's, see above).

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.) In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper. Light horizontal line of discoloration through image, fox mark/stain lower right image.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$100

Titian etching from 1682 THE HOLY FAMILY
(AKA The Madonna of the Cherries)
REF #12

THE HOLY FAMILY
(AKA The Madonna of the Cherries)

In this half-length picture of the Madonna, Titian was still keeping entirely to a pictorial idiom typical of Giovanni Bellini. St Joseph is on the left, and Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist, on the right of the Madonna. John, depicted as a naked boy, is giving the Madonna the cherries that give the painting its name.
Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkles mid image (not very noticeable). Paper loss lower left corner.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$175

Titian etching from 1682 THE HOLY FAMILY
(AKA The Madonna of the Cherries)
REF #12B

THE HOLY FAMILY
(AKA The Madonna of the Cherries)

In this half-length picture of the Madonna, Titian was still keeping entirely to a pictorial idiom typical of Giovanni Bellini. St Joseph is on the left, and Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist, on the right of the Madonna. John, depicted as a naked boy, is giving the Madonna the cherries that give the painting its name.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles mid image and margins (not very noticeable). Two holes at left and right margins (large staples?). Some foxing/staining in margins. Large damp stain left side, well away from image area and a smaller one at top edge of paper.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$100

Titian etching from 1682 THE HOLY FAMILY
(AKA The Madonna of the Cherries)
REF #12C

THE HOLY FAMILY
(AKA The Madonna of the Cherries)

In this half-length picture of the Madonna, Titian was still keeping entirely to a pictorial idiom typical of Giovanni Bellini. St Joseph is on the left, and Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist, on the right of the Madonna. John, depicted as a naked boy, is giving the Madonna the cherries that give the painting its name.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.) In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$50

Titian etching from 1682 THE VIRGIN NURSING THE CHRIST CHILD
REF #13B

THE VIRGIN NURSING THE CHRIST CHILD
(AKA The Madonna Nursing)

Beautiful Titian engraving depicting the Madonna nursing the Christ Child

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 16 1/2 x 10 1/2 inches (approx. 41.9 x 26.7 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: some damp staining in margins

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$100

Titian etching from 1682 Landscape with the Rape of Europa
REF #14

Landscape with the Rape of Europa

The Rape of Europa. Landscape with two women resting on a river-bank in the foreground, Europa being abducted by Jupiter in the guise of a cow and swimming in the river at right, a bridge with buildings in background
Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkles mid image (not very noticeable). Large damp stain on left side – well away from image area

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$175

Titian etching from 1682 Landscape with the Rape of Europa
REF #14B

Landscape with the Rape of Europa

The Rape of Europa. Landscape with two women resting on a river-bank in the foreground, Europa being abducted by Jupiter in the guise of a cow and swimming in the river at right, a bridge with buildings in background

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.) In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles, some overall age-toning of paper

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$100

Titian etching from 1682 Landscape with the Rape of Europa
REF #14C

Landscape with the Rape of Europa

The Rape of Europa. Landscape with two women resting on a river-bank in the foreground, Europa being abducted by Jupiter in the guise of a cow and swimming in the river at right, a bridge with buildings in background

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.) In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$50

Titian etching from 1682 Landscape with Sleeping Shepherd
REF #15

Landscape with Sleeping Shepherd

Landscape with a sleeping shepherd under a tree. A herd of animals grazes next to him. A brook winds through the landscape to the right, houses stand in the distance.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

etching printed and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles. Stain / mark lower margin.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$125

Titian etching from 1682 Landscape with Sleeping Shepherd
REF #15B

Landscape with Sleeping Shepherd

Landscape with a sleeping shepherd under a tree. A herd of animals grazes next to him. A brook winds through the landscape to the right, houses stand in the distance.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles, short tear at edges. Large dampstain left side, well away from image area.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$100

Titian etching from 1682 Landscape with Sleeping Shepherd
REF #15C

Landscape with Sleeping Shepherd

Landscape with a sleeping shepherd under a tree. A herd of animals grazes next to him. A brook winds through the landscape to the right, houses stand in the distance.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF
etching printed and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.) In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper. Stain/mark right edge of image.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$50

Titian etching from 1682 The Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy
REF #16

The Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy

Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy is a 1516 oil on canvas painting, now in the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow, which purchased it from the McLellan collection in 1856. The Madonna's pose is based on that of Raphael's Esterhazy Madonna. Its attribution is debated. It was previously attributed to the school of Titian, perhaps an autograph work by his brother Francesco Vecellio or by Polidoro Lanzani. It was later identified as an autograph work by Titian himself due to a 1680 print by Le Fébre attributing the image to Titian, though it has now been definitively attributed to Vecellio.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

etching printed and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles. Minor stain / discoloration in a couple of places around edges of etching paper.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$275

Titian etching from 1682 The Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy
REF #16B

The Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy

Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy is a 1516 oil on canvas painting, now in the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow, which purchased it from the McLellan collection in 1856. The Madonna's pose is based on that of Raphael's Esterhazy Madonna. Its attribution is debated. It was previously attributed to the school of Titian, perhaps an autograph work by his brother Francesco Vecellio or by Polidoro Lanzani. It was later identified as an autograph work by Titian himself due to a 1680 print by Le Fébre attributing the image to Titian, though it has now been definitively attributed to Vecellio.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles, short tear at edges. Large dampstain left side, well away from image area.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$150

Titian etching from 1682 Saint Mary (the Blessed Virgin) with the Christ Child, Saint Andrew the Apostle, and Saint Titian of Oderzo
REF #17B

Saint Mary (the Blessed Virgin) with the Christ Child, Saint Andrew the Apostle, and Saint Titian of Oderzo

Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy is a 1516 oil on canvas painting, now in the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow, which purchased it from the McLellan collection in 1856. The Madonna's pose is based on that of Raphael's Esterhazy Madonna. Its attribution is debated. It was previously attributed to the school of Titian, perhaps an autograph work by his brother Francesco Vecellio or by Polidoro Lanzani. It was later identified as an autograph work by Titian himself due to a 1680 print by Le Fébre attributing the image to Titian, though it has now been definitively attributed to Vecellio.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles. Large dampstain left side, well away from image area. Holes at left and right edges (staple holes? Holes from "registering" paper on the press?).

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$225

Titian etching from 1682 Saint Mary (the Blessed Virgin) with the Christ Child, Saint Andrew the Apostle, and Saint Titian of Oderzo
REF #17C

The Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy

Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy is a 1516 oil on canvas painting, now in the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow, which purchased it from the McLellan collection in 1856. The Madonna's pose is based on that of Raphael's Esterhazy Madonna. Its attribution is debated. It was previously attributed to the school of Titian, perhaps an autograph work by his brother Francesco Vecellio or by Polidoro Lanzani. It was later identified as an autograph work by Titian himself due to a 1680 print by Le Fébre attributing the image to Titian, though it has now been definitively attributed to Vecellio.

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF
etching printed and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles, short tear at edges.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$150

Titian etching from 1682 The Annunciation of the Madonna
(AKA The Angel Gabriel announces the birth of Jesus to Mary; the Light of the Holy Spirit on her brow)
REF #18

The Annunciation of the Madonna
(AKA The Angel Gabriel announces the birth of Jesus to Mary; the Light of the Holy Spirit on her brow)

Bible. N.T. Luke 1.26-35. The angel brings Mary two lilies. The light of the Holy Spirit shoots toward her brow. Next to her are a sewing basket, an apple and a game fowl, possibly a partridge. Over the balcony hangs a shawl.

The attitudes and postures of the Virgin and the angel have varied significantly and even interchanged in Christian iconography. The plethora of differing images of the Annunciation provides a real insight into the history of emotion and its representation in gesture. The variations of the Virgin's posture provide much of the interest. Her hand is usually active; sometimes she is intently studying, sometimes she is in a gesture of almost carnal surprise. She may be glorified, or on the other hand she may kneel. Then the angel varies in relation to her: he might kneel before her. After the Council of Trent, the angel was set in the air, "reacting against the excessive 'familiarity' of religious art of the 15th century" (Réau)

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles, mainly in margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$325

Titian etching from 1682 The Annunciation of the Madonna
(AKA The Angel Gabriel announces the birth of Jesus to Mary; the Light of the Holy Spirit on her brow)
REF #18B

The Annunciation of the Madonna
(AKA The Angel Gabriel announces the birth of Jesus to Mary; the Light of the Holy Spirit on her brow)

Bible. N.T. Luke 1.26-35. The angel brings Mary two lilies. The light of the Holy Spirit shoots toward her brow. Next to her are a sewing basket, an apple and a game fowl, possibly a partridge. Over the balcony hangs a shawl.

The attitudes and postures of the Virgin and the angel have varied significantly and even interchanged in Christian iconography. The plethora of differing images of the Annunciation provides a real insight into the history of emotion and its representation in gesture. The variations of the Virgin's posture provide much of the interest. Her hand is usually active; sometimes she is intently studying, sometimes she is in a gesture of almost carnal surprise. She may be glorified, or on the other hand she may kneel. Then the angel varies in relation to her: he might kneel before her. After the Council of Trent, the angel was set in the air, "reacting against the excessive 'familiarity' of religious art of the 15th century" (Réau)

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITHOUT LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, Large damp stains left margin, just extending into lower left of image area. Holes in left and right margin where paper was held in place during the print-making process.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$225

Titian etching from 1682 The Annunciation of the Madonna
(AKA The Angel Gabriel announces the birth of Jesus to Mary; the Light of the Holy Spirit on her brow)
REF #18C

The Annunciation of the Madonna
(AKA The Angel Gabriel announces the birth of Jesus to Mary; the Light of the Holy Spirit on her brow)

Bible. N.T. Luke 1.26-35. The angel brings Mary two lilies. The light of the Holy Spirit shoots toward her brow. Next to her are a sewing basket, an apple and a game fowl, possibly a partridge. Over the balcony hangs a shawl.

The attitudes and postures of the Virgin and the angel have varied significantly and even interchanged in Christian iconography. The plethora of differing images of the Annunciation provides a real insight into the history of emotion and its representation in gesture. The variations of the Virgin's posture provide much of the interest. Her hand is usually active; sometimes she is intently studying, sometimes she is in a gesture of almost carnal surprise. She may be glorified, or on the other hand she may kneel. Then the angel varies in relation to her: he might kneel before her. After the Council of Trent, the angel was set in the air, "reacting against the excessive 'familiarity' of religious art of the 15th century" (Réau)

Source artist: Titian (Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.) In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper. Light staining/foxing around edges of India paper and in margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view. The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$125

Veronese etching from 1682 St. Jerome in the Wilderness
REF #19

St. Jerome in the Wilderness

Veronese portrayed St. Jerome — to whom Degli Arbori's chapel was dedicated — on the altarpiece of the chapel in Murano. Jerome, who lived between the fourth and fifth centuries in Dalmatia, is known primarily for having translated the Bible into Latin. He spent substantial time in the desert, probably in Syria, where he led an ascetic life. In a letter to his friend Eustochium, Jerome describes his trials as follows:

living in the wilderness, in the vast solitude that provides a horrid, sun-scorched abode to monks . . . Tears all day, groans all day — and if, resist it as I might, sleep overwhelmed me, my fleshless bones, hardly holding together, scraped against the bare ground. I say nothing about food or drink . . . All the company I had was scorpions and wild beasts . . . So it was that I wept continually and starved the rebellious flesh for weeks at a time. Often I joined day to night and did not stop beating my breast until the Lord restored my peace of mind . . . Angry and stern with myself I plunged alone, deeper and deeper, into the wasteland; and, as the Lord is my witness, from time to time and after many tears I seemed to be in the midst of throngs of angels.

While living as a monk in Bethlehem, Jerome was visited by what was to become one of his most frequent iconographic symbols. As he and the other monks were reading the Scriptures, a lion limped into the monastery. The men began to flee in terror, but Jerome realized that the animal was injured and asked his fellow monks to stay and help him remove the thorn that tormented the animal's paw. He then dressed the wound, and the lion, once healed, "lost all his wildness, and lived among [them] like a house pet."

Veronese depicts Jerome in the desert, with trees framing the composition. On the right, wooden beams held together by ropes and covered by a roof of leaves indicate a rudimentary shelter from the elements. Beneath is a still life of objects traditionally associated with Jerome: a crucifix, an hourglass, a skull, and two open books. The hourglass and skull refer to the transience of life, while the volumes allude to Jerome's translation of the Bible. The saint is an isolated figure in this landscape, alone in his gruelling devotion. His muscular body is tense, covered only by a red cloth secured by a cord. Toothless and haggard, he focuses his tear-filled eyes on the crucifix, while beating his chest with a rock. The bruised ribs are visible, and drops of blood testify to his self-punishment. A divine wind rustles the saint's graying beard in an extraordinary passage of bravura painting. The faithful lion on the left is the only witness to his frenzied state.

Source artist: Paulo Veronese (born Paolo Caliari, 1528–1588)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682
An original etching/engraving, 340 years old
Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural horizontal paper wrinkles mid image (not very noticeable). Fox stain in margin.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view.
The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$275

Veronese etching from 1682 St. Jerome in the Wilderness
REF #19B

St. Jerome in the Wilderness

Veronese portrayed St. Jerome — to whom Degli Arbori's chapel was dedicated — on the altarpiece of the chapel in Murano. Jerome, who lived between the fourth and fifth centuries in Dalmatia, is known primarily for having translated the Bible into Latin. He spent substantial time in the desert, probably in Syria, where he led an ascetic life. In a letter to his friend Eustochium, Jerome describes his trials as follows:

living in the wilderness, in the vast solitude that provides a horrid, sun-scorched abode to monks . . . Tears all day, groans all day — and if, resist it as I might, sleep overwhelmed me, my fleshless bones, hardly holding together, scraped against the bare ground. I say nothing about food or drink . . . All the company I had was scorpions and wild beasts . . . So it was that I wept continually and starved the rebellious flesh for weeks at a time. Often I joined day to night and did not stop beating my breast until the Lord restored my peace of mind . . . Angry and stern with myself I plunged alone, deeper and deeper, into the wasteland; and, as the Lord is my witness, from time to time and after many tears I seemed to be in the midst of throngs of angels.

While living as a monk in Bethlehem, Jerome was visited by what was to become one of his most frequent iconographic symbols. As he and the other monks were reading the Scriptures, a lion limped into the monastery. The men began to flee in terror, but Jerome realized that the animal was injured and asked his fellow monks to stay and help him remove the thorn that tormented the animal's paw. He then dressed the wound, and the lion, once healed, "lost all his wildness, and lived among [them] like a house pet."

Veronese depicts Jerome in the desert, with trees framing the composition. On the right, wooden beams held together by ropes and covered by a roof of leaves indicate a rudimentary shelter from the elements. Beneath is a still life of objects traditionally associated with Jerome: a crucifix, an hourglass, a skull, and two open books. The hourglass and skull refer to the transience of life, while the volumes allude to Jerome's translation of the Bible. The saint is an isolated figure in this landscape, alone in his gruelling devotion. His muscular body is tense, covered only by a red cloth secured by a cord. Toothless and haggard, he focuses his tear-filled eyes on the crucifix, while beating his chest with a rock. The bruised ribs are visible, and drops of blood testify to his self-punishment. A divine wind rustles the saint's graying beard in an extraordinary passage of bravura painting. The faithful lion on the left is the only witness to his frenzied state.

Source artist: Paulo Veronese (born Paolo Caliari, 1528–1588)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.)

Sheet size: approximately 16 1/2 x 10 1/2 inches (approx. 41.9 x 26.7 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles mid image and margins (not very noticeable). Holes at top and bottom margins (large staples or how printer "registered" the print on the press). Some light foxing/staining in margins.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view.
The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$125

Veronese etching from 1682 St. Jerome in the Wilderness
REF #19C

St. Jerome in the Wilderness

Veronese portrayed St. Jerome — to whom Degli Arbori's chapel was dedicated — on the altarpiece of the chapel in Murano. Jerome, who lived between the fourth and fifth centuries in Dalmatia, is known primarily for having translated the Bible into Latin. He spent substantial time in the desert, probably in Syria, where he led an ascetic life. In a letter to his friend Eustochium, Jerome describes his trials as follows:

living in the wilderness, in the vast solitude that provides a horrid, sun-scorched abode to monks . . . Tears all day, groans all day — and if, resist it as I might, sleep overwhelmed me, my fleshless bones, hardly holding together, scraped against the bare ground. I say nothing about food or drink . . . All the company I had was scorpions and wild beasts . . . So it was that I wept continually and starved the rebellious flesh for weeks at a time. Often I joined day to night and did not stop beating my breast until the Lord restored my peace of mind . . . Angry and stern with myself I plunged alone, deeper and deeper, into the wasteland; and, as the Lord is my witness, from time to time and after many tears I seemed to be in the midst of throngs of angels.

While living as a monk in Bethlehem, Jerome was visited by what was to become one of his most frequent iconographic symbols. As he and the other monks were reading the Scriptures, a lion limped into the monastery. The men began to flee in terror, but Jerome realized that the animal was injured and asked his fellow monks to stay and help him remove the thorn that tormented the animal's paw. He then dressed the wound, and the lion, once healed, "lost all his wildness, and lived among [them] like a house pet."

Veronese depicts Jerome in the desert, with trees framing the composition. On the right, wooden beams held together by ropes and covered by a roof of leaves indicate a rudimentary shelter from the elements. Beneath is a still life of objects traditionally associated with Jerome: a crucifix, an hourglass, a skull, and two open books. The hourglass and skull refer to the transience of life, while the volumes allude to Jerome's translation of the Bible. The saint is an isolated figure in this landscape, alone in his gruelling devotion. His muscular body is tense, covered only by a red cloth secured by a cord. Toothless and haggard, he focuses his tear-filled eyes on the crucifix, while beating his chest with a rock. The bruised ribs are visible, and drops of blood testify to his self-punishment. A divine wind rustles the saint's graying beard in an extraordinary passage of bravura painting. The faithful lion on the left is the only witness to his frenzied state.

Source artist: Paulo Veronese (born Paolo Caliari, 1528–1588)
Etcher: Valentino le Febvre of Brussels (1642–1682)
Publisher: Giacamo Van Campen (1596–1647)
Pubished in Venice in 1682

An original etching/engraving, 340 years old

COUNTERPROOF WITH LETTERING
etching printed on India paper and then adhered to the chainlaid backing paper

(In printmaking, a counterproof is a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of the plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the printmaker to inspect the state of the plate.) In general, the counterproofs on India paper have a much lighter appearance.

Sheet size: approximately 15 3/4 x 22 3/8 inches (approx. 40 x 56.5 cm), chain-laid paper

CONDITION ISSUES: minor edge/corner wear, natural paper wrinkles on backing paper.

Please click on the thumbnail image for an enlarged view.
The Darvill's digital watermark does not appear on the actual antique etching.

$100

more Titian and Veronese etchings from 1682

Original Antique and Vintage Masterpiece Art prints

Antique and Vintage Religion/Mythology prints

BIOGRAPHIES OF TITIAN, VERONESE, AND TINTORETTO

(Source: www.theartstory.org)

Titian's self-portrait

 

Titian

(Tiziano Vecelli, 1488/90–1576)

Who Was Titian?

Titian became an artist's apprentice in Venice as a teenager and worked with Sebastiano Zuccato, Giovanni Bellini and Giorgione before branching out on his own. Titian became one of Venice's leading artists around 1518 with the completion of "Assumption of the Virgin." He was soon creating for works for leading members of royalty, including King Philip II of Spain and Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor. Pope Paul III also hired Titian to paint portraits of himself and his grandsons. 

Early Life

Born Tiziano Vecellio in what is now Pieve di Cadore, Italy, sometime between 1488 and 1490, Titian is considered one of the greatest painters of the Italian Renaissance. The oldest of four children born to Gregorio and Lucia Vecellio, Titian spent his early years in the town of Pieve di Cadore, near the Dolomite mountains.

In his teens, Titian became an apprentice to the Venetian artist Sebastiano Zuccato. He soon went work with such leading artists as Giovanni Bellini and Giorgione. Giorgione proved to be especially influential to the young painter.

Major Works

In 1516, Titian began work on his first major commission for a church called Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari in Venice. He painted "Assumption of the Virgin" (1516-1518) for the church's high altar, a masterwork that helped establish Titian as one of the leading painters in the area. He was known for his deft use of color and for his appealing renderings of the human form.

A short time after completing the legendary altarpiece, Titian created "The Worship of Venus" (1518-1519). This mythology-inspired work was just one of several commissioned by Alfonso I d'Este, duke of Ferrara. Titian managed to cultivate a broad range of royal patrons during his career, including King Philip II of Spain and Holy Roman Emperor Charles V.

Titian's Venetian home was a mecca for many of the community's artistic types. He had an especially close friendship with writer Pietro Aretino. Aretino is said to have helped Titian get some of his commissions. Sculptor and architect Jacopo Sansovino was another frequent visitor.

Over the years, Titian created portraits of leading figures of the day. He painted two works featuring Pope Paul III between 1545 and '46, and spent six months living at the Vatican while making these paintings. In 1548, he traveled to the court of Charles V, where he painted his portrait as well.

In his later career, Titian focused more on religious and mythological works. For Spain's Philip II, he painted "Venus and Adonis" (c. 1554), a piece inspired by Ovid's "Metamorphoses" that shows the goddess Venus trying in vain to hold on to her beloved Adonis. Titian again explored his fascination with the Roman goddess of love in "Venus and the Lute Player" (1565-1570).

Death and Legacy

Titian continued to paint until his death, on August 27, 1576, in Venice. He reportedly died of the plague. The same illness had claimed the life of his son, Orazio, a few months later. His other son, Pomponio, sold his father's house and its contents in 1581. Some of the artwork there can now be found in museums around the world, including the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Through the wealth of works he left behind, Titian has inspired countless generations of artists. Rembrandt, Diego Velázquez, Antoon van Dyck and Peter Paul Rubens are just a handful of painters who were influenced by the great Venetian artist.

Self-portrait of Veronese

 

Paolo Veronese

(born Paolo Caliari, 1528–1588)

Childhood and Early Training

The youngest of five siblings, Paolo Caliari, nicknamed Veronese after his birthplace, was born in 1528 in the Italian city of Verona, then a mainland province of the Republic of Venice. His father, Gabriele, was a stonecutter; his mother, Catherina, the illegitimate daughter of a nobleman called Antonio Caliari. He was born moreover in Verona's artists' quarter in the district of San Paolo, which may well have accounted for his parents' choice of Christian name. Paolo initially apprenticed under his father which meant he went for a time by his professional name too: Paolo Spezapreda ("Paolo the Stonecutter"). However, while working with his father, Paolo's precocious talent for drawing became apparent and, aged 14, his apprenticeship was transferred to the studio of a local master named Antonio Bandile (he would later marry Bandile's daughter). It is suggested in some unconfirmed accounts that he may have studied simultaneously in the workshops of Giovanni Francesco Caroto, from whom, he may have inherited his fascination with the application of color.

Veronese's talent soon saw him exceed the standards usually demanded of Bandile's students. He had already moved away from the naturalistic tones of the High Renaissance and started to develop his own preference for a more colorful, more expressive, palette. He assisted Bandile with altarpieces in 1543 and 1544 and sections of these works would already bear his signature style. Having seen Veronese's work on the altarpieces, Michele Sanmicheli, the architect of many important buildings in Verona, provided Veronese with his first important commission working on frescoes for the Palazzo Canossa (1545-46). Veronese moved briefly to Mantua in 1548 where he made the acquaintance of Giulio Romano, Raphael's principle pupil and assistant, and one of the pioneers of the Mannerist style, a style well suited to Veronese's penchant for painterly elegance. Veronese created frescoes in the city's Duomo (Roman Catholic Cathedral) before he left for Venice in 1552.

Mature Period

1553 was an important year for Veronese. Not only had he relocated to Venice, but his father died. He took the name Caliari from his mother in the hope that this would afford him greater access to the Venetian aristocracy, while he used the name "Veronese" predominantly for signing purposes and to draw attention to his place of birth. Working in Venice allowed him to take advantage of the new demand for Venetian painting stirred by the likes of Giorgione, Titian, and Tintoretto. Following in their esteemed footsteps, Veronese quickly received commissions from governing bodies including the Hall of the Council of Ten and confraternities like San Sebastiano.

It is unusual to talk of a painter's "Mature Period" starting in their mid-twenties. But such was Veronese's talent even Giorgio Vasari, author of newly published The Lives of the Most Eminent Sculptors, Painters, and Architects (1550), was taken by the fact that someone so young could have already made such an illustrious career for himself. Indeed, Veronese's first Venetian commission was his Sacra Conversazione (Holy Conversion) for the San Francesco della Vigna church in 1552. This was followed in 1553 by his first state commissions: ceiling paintings for both the Hall of the Council of Ten (Sala dei Cosiglio dei Dieci) and Doge's Palace (Palazzo Ducale), the latter being the supreme seat of power for the Venetian republic. He followed with a History of Esther in the ceiling for the church of San Sebastiano and further works in the Ducal Palace and the Marciana Library sealed his standing as a Venetian Master.

Late period

Veronese soon began receiving patronage from powerful aristocratic families such as the Barbaro family for whom he decorated the Villa Barbaro (their stately home near Maser). In the latter part of the 1550s, Veronese decorated the villa of Venice's most renowned architect Andrea Palladio. The collaboration between artist and architect was widely regarded as a triumph of art and design and Palladio would later describe Veronese in his Four Books on Architecture (1570) as "the most excellent painter". For his part, Veronese referenced their professional ties by including Palladian buildings in his great masterpiece, The Wedding at Cana (1563). Meanwhile, Veronese continued to work (as did Tintoretto) on restorations at Doge's Palace (Palazzo Ducale) during the 1560s and 1570s following a succession of serious fires. Veronese married Elena (Bandile's daughter) in 1566, welcoming their first of five children (fours sons; one daughter) in 1568. Veronese's mother Catherina had also moved to Venice by this time.

Though a decade of great uncertainty for Venice, Veronese consolidated his status and strong family ties during the 1570s. In 1571, as part of the Holy League (that being a league comprised of the great Catholic maritime powers) Venice defeated the Ottoman Empire and Veronese named his only daughter, Vittoria, in honor of this victory in 1572. The resultant Counter Reformation, which saw a great resurgence in Catholic culture, was beginning to bring its influence to Venice. There was now less demand for erotic or mythological works and Veronese was called on to produce smaller devotional paintings. Between 1574 and 1577 major fires and plagues afflicted Venice (the plague claiming Titian in 1576) and Veronese began investing his substantial wealth in land and property. By the 1580s he had established a workshop with his sons and brother Benedetto and while initially the quality of the studio's work was considered uneven (at best), the workshop eventually began producing great works independently of its Master's hand. Veronese, who, incidentally had reverted to his proper name Paolo Caliari in 1575, died from pneumonia in 1588 and was buried in the Church of San Sebastiano, surrounded by his artistic contributions to the church.

The Legacy of Paolo Veronese

For at least a decade after his passing Veronese's family used sketches and drawings to complete more works from the studio signed under the name "Heirs of Paolo" while prints of Veronese's work were in high demand even during his own lifetime; something highly unusual for a living artist at that time. This allowed for his Mannerist style to be transported and admired far beyond its time and place of origin. Art historian Clare Robertson links Veronese for instance to the important French artist Eugene Delacroix, whose Liberty Leading the People (1830) utilises dramatic lighting and references contemporary architecture in the manner of the Veronese tableau The Wedding at Cana. Xavier F. Solomon, author of the National Gallery's catalogue on Veronese, meanwhile, has linked him to Flemish Baroquepainter Peter Paul Rubens through his focus on narrative and luminous color as seen in works like The Descent from the Cross (1612-14).

It is also known that Diego Velázquez, acquired Veronese's Venus and Adoni(c.1580) at some point during his trip to Italy between 1649 and 1651, and, through an intricate composition of figures set in a rigid architectural setting, Veronese's influence can be traced in works such as Las Meninas (1656). It is known too that in 1797 Napoleon had thought so highly of The Wedding at Cana(1563) that he ordered his troops to roll up the canvas and transport it to Paris. It eventually took its place in the Louvre opposite the Mona Lisa where it was admired, not only by Delacroix, but also by the poet Charles Baudelairewho was moved enough to write about Veronese's "heavenly, afternoon colors."

 

Tintoretto's self-portrait

 

Tintoretto

(born Jacobo Robusti, 1518–1594)

Childhood and Education

There are few details known about the childhood and early life of the Italian artist Tintoretto. Born Jacopo Robusti, even the year of his birth is unclear with scholars placing it sometime in either 1518 or 1519. He is known to have come from Venice, however, making him one of the few iconic artists of the Venetian School to have been born in this city.

His father, Giovanni Battista Robusti, was a cloth dyer; an occupation which would influence his son's artistic style surrounding the young Jacopo with colors, pigments, and other artistic mediums virtually from infancy. This trade also provided the inspiration for the name he would ultimately adopt, according to art historian Stefania Mason, he "...proudly declared the family connection with dyeing when he adopted the nickname by which he remains best known - Tintoretto, 'the little dyer' - as seen in his signature on paintings as well as various documents."

Early Training

Although no definitive records exist, it is generally believed that Tintoretto's training began sometime in his early teens with a brief stint as an apprentice in the workshop of the famed Venetian painter, Titian. This association did not last long with many speculating it was due to a strong clash of personalities between the old master and the more progressive exuberant and boundary-pushing personality of the young pupil.

Largely self-taught after this experience, Tintoretto would continue to develop his skills in part through making paintings on furniture. In Italy, at the time, there was a great demand for cassoni or ornate chests decorated with paintings, and it is here that Tintoretto is believed to have developed his distinctive approach characterized by rapidly executed loose brushwork often appearing sketch-like and, at times, incomplete. In his book, "Tintoretto: Tradition and Identity," art historian Tom Nichols writes, "In a number of small-scale paintings attributable to his earliest period, Tintoretto radically abbreviates his treatment of form, the sketchy effect being reinforced by his employment of a limited range of broken tones, close to one another on the color scale [...] Works such as these were intended to adorn furniture, and support [early biographer Carlo] Ridolfi's report that Tintoretto associated with painters of this type who peddled their wares from temporary wooden booths set up in St. Mark's Square. Ridolfi tells us that it was in this public (but professionally marginal) context that Tintoretto first learned the 'method of handling colors' particular to the cassoni painters."

Tintoretto's gestural style, although once fashionable with associations to the earlier master Giorgione, was by then equated with the lower ranking cassoni painters. This left Tintoretto out of favor with some of his fellow Venetian artists and patrons. The writings of the artist Giorgio Vasari, best-known today for his biographies of the Renaissance artists, illustrate just how radical Tintoretto's technique was to his contemporary audience. Vasari writes, "this master at times has left us finished work sketches so rough that the brushstrokes may be seen. Done more by chance and vehemence than with judgement and design." While this passage may read as critical, perhaps to show a preference for the internationally recognized, and considerably more polished technique, of Titian, another quote shows Vasari's admiration for the bravura of Tintoretto's brushwork, citing the younger artist as "the most extraordinary brain that the art of painting has produced."

Mature Period

From as early as 1538, there is evidence of Tintoretto having his own workshop and referring to himself as a professional working in Venice. From the outset, the young artist set himself apart from his former teacher Titian, despite the popularity of his rival's accomplishments. Tintoretto's interest in, and emulation of, Michelangelo's approach to painting was especially disagreeable to his former master. According to curators Robert Echols and Frederich Ilchman, as they wrote in the 2019 exhibition catalog, Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice, the young artist"...presented himself in the role of a challenger to the established tradition as embodied by Titian and identified himself instead with the newest ideas circulating in Venetian painting. In the early 1540s that meant emulating contemporary currents in Florence and Rome, and above all Michelangelo, the biggest name in all of Italian art. [...] While the concept of an avant-garde painter aiming for 'the shock of the new' was not one articulated in the sixteenth century, Tintoretto was positioning himself on the cutting edge of Venetian painting." Unfortunately, Titian never forgave what he considered Tintoretto's disrespect and attempted on numerous occasions to thwart the younger artist's advancement by blocking Tintoretto's success in obtaining commissions and membership in various organizations.

Despite Titian's disapproval, Tintoretto began to make a name for himself, first through a series of public works in the form of mural fresco paintings. He was able to gain work through charging extraordinarily low fees, often only covering the cost of materials, to gain exposure to a larger audience. This strategy proved successful, as Tintoretto began gaining commissions, including many religious works for which he would remain best known, including multiple depictions of the Last Supper, the first of which he created in 1547. Arguably it was his first masterpiece, The Miracle of the Slave, (1548) that brought him to the attention of the larger Venetian public and patrons and, in effect, launched his career.

As Tintoretto began to prosper professionally, he also flourished in his personal life. He became friends with many of the leading literary figures of the day. Then, around 1550 he married Faustina Episcopi whose father was affiliated with the Scuola Grande di San Marco confraternity for whom he had created a painting. They would have eight children; three of whom would become artists.

In addition to church commissions, a major source of employment for Tintoretto and other Venetian painters during the 16th century was for confraternities or scuolas. These organizations played a large role in the cosmopolitan Venetian culture, organized around a variety of purposes ranging from national origin to acts of public service, such as helping the ill and poverty-stricken. Over time, these scuolas acquired great wealth from their affluent members which provided a major source of patronage for the Venetian artists. Although Titian managed to block some of these commissions from Tintoretto, including from the Scuola Grande di San Rocco which Titian secured for himself in 1553, he never actually completed the assignment. Despite this occasion, Tintoretto was able to skillfully navigate the competitive process from which he benefitted greatly throughout his career.

In fact, Tintoretto seemed destined to face challenges by other artists despite how impressively his reputation grew. The second major competition came in the form of Paolo Veronese who arrived in Venice in the late 1550s. Art historians Echols and Ilchman describe the impact of Veronese as"...unofficially but publically recognized as Titian's successor, as the older artist presented him with a golden chain for having executed the best ceiling painting for the reading room of Jacopo Sansovino's Libreria Marciana - a competition from which Tintoretto had humiliatingly been excluded. With this coveted position as the next leader of Venetian painting seeming to slip through his fingers, Tintoretto had to contend not only with Titian's machinations but with the undeniable talent of Veronese."

Rather than concede defeat, Tintoretto persevered and strengthened his status by focusing on works characteristic of his style that set him apart from the more traditional approaches of Titian and Veronese. In so doing he made increasingly dramatic works, densely populated with figures creating rhythmic contrasts in light and dark that appeared more Mannerist than Renaissance in style.

Tintoretto often employed questionably ethical means to secure coveted commissions, at times reducing the fee for his paintings enough to undercut other artists. The most notorious example of his strategic ingenuity centered around a competition for a ceiling painting for the new meeting house of the Scuola Grande di San Rocco in 1564. The prospectus from the confraternity called for selected artists, including Tintoretto, to submit a sketch for the proposed ceiling painting. Tintoretto, rather than providing a sketch, unveiled his completed panel, already installed on the ceiling. When others objected, he presented the painting as a donation, knowing that the confraternity would be obligated to accept a gift. The strategy worked, and by promising to render all additional paintings for the house for an annual salary of 100 ducats, the artist secured an exclusive contract with numerous commissions over the following two decades. Tintoretto was also admitted into the confraternity in 1565, where he would go on to hold various offices.

Tintoretto was only known to have left Venice once to travel to Mantua, at the age of 62, in 1580. This was four years after the death of his rival, Titian, who had of all the Venetian painters, dominated the international stage. It was during this later period that Tintoretto also received a few important international commissions including an altarpiece for King Philip II of Spain and four works for the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II. He also painted an increasing number of non-religious themed paintings during this time. In these later years, he also created portraits and received many commissions from the Venetian state. One of the most notable being his creation of the large-scale painting, titled Paradiso, in 1592 for the Ducal Palace.

As he neared the end of his life, Tintoretto increasingly relied on the help of his studio assistants to finish his paintings, including Paradiso. Most notable of those assistants were three of his nine children: daughter Marietta and sons Domenico and Marco. The artist was devastated when his oldest daughter, whom he lovingly nicknamed 'la Tintoretta,' died during childbirth in 1590. Just four years later, Tintoretto died fifteen days after contracting a fever. His sons would continue the work of his studio for many years, perhaps still under the guidance of those words Tintoretto had inscribed on its wall years before: Il disegno di Michelangelo e il colorito di Tiziano (The drawing of Michelangelo and the coloring of Titian).

The Legacy of Jacopo Tintoretto

Jacopo Tintoretto left an indelible mark on 16th-century Venetian painting and beyond. His unique approach to artmaking with rapid, loose brushstrokes and strong contrasts between light and dark deeply challenged the traditional style of the iconic master Titian, Paolo Veronese, and his Venetian contemporaries. His bold compositions offered an alternative style to the hierarchal staging of the traditional Renaissance paintings. Because of this, Tintoretto is often associated with the Mannerist painters of the later Renaissance period.

His influence, however, was felt long after his own time. Tintoretto's highly dramatic, almost theatrical compositions would serve as inspiration for the development of the 17th-century Baroque art movement. The impact of his gestural style, notable for its obvious traces of his brushwork, reverberates in the passionate style of Diego Velázquez and Peter Paul Rubens. His early self-portrait, dated to 1548, is considered a precedent to those of later artists including Rembrandt; while the contemplative mood of his much later self-portrait, was described by the modernist icon Edouard Manet as "one of the most beautiful paintings in the world."

Tintoretto's influence continues to permeate the world of painting, impacting contemporary artists most notably in the grand, expressionistic aspects of his compositions. According to Echols and Ilchman, "in our time, such painters as Emilio Vedova, Anselm Kiefer, and Jorge Pombo have specifically measured themselves against Tintoretto, creating huge canvases filled with audacious brushwork and coloristic effects."

more Titian and Veronese etchings from 1682

Original Antique and Vintage Masterpiece Art prints

Antique and Vintage Religion/Mythology prints