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Seymour's Humorous Sketches Illustrated in Prose and Verse
by Alfred Crowquill (Alfred Henry Forrester)

1878, London, George Routledge and Sons, printers

Original hand-coloured (albeit poorly) engravings
by Henry Wallis, after sketches by Robert Seymour
Sheet size: approximately 5 7/8 x 9 7/8 inches
(scattered foxing on some plates, please see enlargements)

FOR BLACK AND WHITE VERSIONS FROM THE 1866 EDITION, PLEASE CLICK HERE

Robert Seymour, a graphic humourist of the highest order, was born in or near London, about the year 1800. He was apprenticed at the usual age to Mr. Thomas Vaughan, an eminent pattern-drawer in Spitalfields, and his practice in that department of art appears to have given him the facility and accuracy of pencil for which he was afterwards so distinguished. Within a very short period of fulfilling his term of apprenticeship, he commenced, on his own account, as a painter in oils, and must have been tolerably expert at that early age, as already in the spring of 1822, we find him exhibiting a picture of some pretensions at the Royal Academy.

Source: Biographical Notice from Seymour's Humorous Sketches by publisher Henry G. Bohn.

Every Day Scenes, Scene 26
Every Day Scenes, Scene 26
(Old Foozle Angling.)

I say, Jack, are there any fish in this pond?

They must be werry small, cos there vos no no vater in it afor that 'ere rain yesterday.

$20

The Crack Shots
The "Crack Shots." No. 2
(The Booby Sportsman.)

How dare you carry a loaded gun pointed at people's viscera, you booby.

I don't know what you mean, I never shot a wiserar.

$15

The Crack Shots
The "Crack Shots." No. 3
(A natural alarm.)

You needn't be afeard Sir, I ant a haming at you.

$15

The Bumpkin
The Bumpkin
(Domestic Economy, old woman presiding.)

Old Woman: Not make a dinner of Horsebeans? you dainty dog. I wish you may never have worse.
Plough Boy: Noa, mother; I hopes I never shall.


$15

Practice
Practice
(School-boys Rifle shooting.)

Out of the way, Sugar-lips, I am sure I shall hit him this time.

$15

A Day's Pleasure. No. 2.
A Day's Pleasure. No. 2.
(The Journey Out.)

It's werry hot but werry pleasant.

$15

A Day's Pleasure. No. 3
A Day's Pleasure. No. 3. Dobb's Duck.
(Mr. Dobbs's wife overboard.)

The deep, deep Sea.

Mr. Dobbs singing—"Hearts as warm as those above lie under the waters cold."

$15

Practical Joker
Practical Joker. No. 1
(Jim Smith, masked as a Demon, perched on a Stile.)

D'ye want a pound of magic shot?


Practical Joker
Practical Joker. No. 2
(Tom's Reprisal—about to shoot.)

Oh, Tom don't shoot, don't shoot, it's only me—Jim Smith.

$20

City Sportsmen Feeding
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 4
(City Sportsmen Feeding.)

I say, Jim, what birds are most like now?

Why, swallows to be sure!

$15

Irish Smugglers
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 6
(A Commission. The Irish Smugglers.)

Och thin, Paddy, what's the botheration, if you carry me? don't I carry the whisky, sure, and that's fair and equal.

$15

The Cricket Match
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 7
The Cricket Match
(Maximo-rotundo Crobble bowled out.)

Out!, so don't fatigue yourself, I beg, Sir.

$20

Monsieur Dubois
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 12
Monsieur Dubois
(A poor French teacher, with Episode of a fighting dustman and a crossing-sweeper.)

I shan't fight with fistesses, its vulgar, but if he's a mind for anything like a gemmen here's my card.

$15

A Dilemma
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 14
A Dilemma
(A chaise party in a fix, having lost their way.)

A Country Excursion

Ee cawnt gow back 'cause tha locks tha gates. Well can we go forward then?
Noa ee cawnt cawse the roads under water.


$15

Musical dustman
Andrew Mullins—Chapter 16
The Loss of a Friend
(A Musical Dustman in a music-shop.)

I say, Marm, do you happen to have the hair of 'All round my hat,' or 'I vears a green villow.'

$15

The Mill-stream Angler
The Mill-stream Angler
(An elderly Sportsman angling in the eddy of a millstream, his coat tails being nailed fast by the Miller's men.)

This mill makes a plaguey hammering.

$15

A Rigamarole
A Rigmarole. Part 1.
(A trust without trust, driver's pocket empty.)

Turnpike man: You should have gone home the way you came out, that ticket won't do here so out with your coppers, threepence.

Cockney: I doesn't think I've got any halfpence.

Turnpike man: Well, then I must give you change.

Cockney: But I'm afeard I havn't got any silver left. I say mister, cou'd'nt you trust me. I'd be werry sure to bring it to you.

$20

A Rigamarole
A Rigmarole. Part 3.
(Sportsman in a Flower-garden.)

Have you seen the hounds this way, my good man Hounds? Dogs I mean, you know what a pack of hunds are, don't you?

$20

An Intercepted Letter
An Intercepted Letter.
(Dick Slammer on his donkey, and the Starch-up-man on his hunter; a bit of Slang.)

I say, sir d'y think we shall be in time for the hunt?

Oh! you needn't be so shy, I rides my own hanimal.

$15

Gone!
Nobbs' and Dobbs' Misadventure. Gone.
(Nobbs and Nobbs' son losing their fish, basket, bait-box, &c., in the river.)

Gone!!!

$25

Dunghill Sporting
Dunghill Sporting
(Dick Grubb in a scrape, for shooting a drake; gets up a tree.)

Dang it Pincher, hod un fast!

$20

FOR BLACK AND WHITE VERSIONS OF THESE PRINTS, PLEASE CLICK HERE

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